Distilling market noise into market sense

VisionMobile is the leading research company in the app economy. Our Developer Economics research program tracks developer experiences across platforms, revenues, apps, tools, APIs, segments and regions, via the largest, most global developer surveys.

Which apps make money?

[Which apps make money – and how? Andreas Pappas takes another look at the results of VisionMobile’s Developer Economics 2012 survey and comes up with interesting new insights on app monetisation: how does app revenue vary by app-category and by country? Is there a correlation between time spent developing an app and they money it makes?]

VisionMobile - which apps make money

In Developer Economics 2012 we discussed app revenues and how they vary across platforms. We found that overall, around half of all app developers that are interested in making money did not earn a sustaining income, i.e. they were below the “poverty line”, which we drew at $500 per month per app. Of course the real poverty line will vary widely across countries and regions: while $500 per month may not be enough for a San Francisco-based developer, it could be more than enough for a developer based in Bangalore where average living cost is less than a third, according to Numbeo.

Fashion Tech: how retailers are accelerating the app phenomenon

[Did you ever think that your mobile can be your remote control for shopping? It’s getting there. Guest author Zabetta Camilleri reviews how mobile apps are changing Fashion Retailing with brands such as Burberry, Forever21, Shopkick, Shopstyle, SalesGossip, Chanel,Tommy Hilfiger & Clotheshorse leading the way in mobile app innovation.]

There’s no doubt ‘Fashion Tech’ has become the latest buzzword in retail. The innovation we’ve seen in the Mobile apps space has already disrupted the age-old industry of fashion retail. Now we are witnessing some important trends that will continue to change the way we shop for fashion online as well as on the high street.

Mobile platform wars: Winners and losers in 2012

[The game of ecosystems is in full bloom, with each player attempting to draw as many developers as possible around their platform. As we finally see some signs of consolidation, VisionMobile Senior Analyst Andreas Pappas, talks about the rules of engagement and identifies the winners and losers in this game of ecosystems in 2012. Also, we’re proud to introduce VisionMobile Visualisations – live, interactive graphs with tons of data from the Developer Economics 2012 research!]

Below, we’d like to present a very small sample of our newly-launched Visualisations, depicting how Intentshare varies by the platform developers choose. The sample contains just one variable – for more filters and full functionality, visit visualisations.visionmobile.com

INTENTSHARE INDEX
Percentage of developers planning to adopt each platform, irrespective of which platform they’re primarily using now.

The graph above is just a sample of what our new Visualisations can do – visit visualisations.visionmobile.com for full functionality. Just bear in mind that you need a minimum resolution of 1024 × 768 px to access.

Developer Economics 2012 (free copy available here, thanks to the sponsorship by BlueVia) confirmed that reach remains the strongest motive for platform selection, as indicated by 54% of developers. With Android and iOS accounting for 82% of total smartphone sales in Q1 2012, according to IDC, these two platforms can now guarantee near ubiquitous smartphone reach for developers using them. As a result, developers’ mindshare is being increasingly dominated by these two platforms: Android is being used by three-quarters of developers and iOS is being used by 66% of developers.

Why some publishers are abandoning apps and betting on the Web

[Why are publishers abandoning apps and betting on the Web? VisionMobile Senior Analyst Andreas Pappas looks into the flight of magazine publishers from native iOS apps to web-based platforms]

The Story

When the iPad first appeared on the market, publishers immediately saw its potential as a media-consumption device. Indeed they were right: iPad (and tablet) users are more likely to buy content than smartphone users. What they were not right about though was that native apps were the right vehicle to break into this market. A number of high-profile publishers have been recently abandoning native apps in favour of the mobile web. Among these are the Financial Times which moved to mobile web last year and MIT Technology Review magazine which is migrating this year. These moves come after investing significant time & money in developing native apps, and seeing their high-expectations failing to materialise.

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